Rights Wire

The Human Rights Blog of the Leitner Center for International Law and Justice

Human rights of transgender individuals and finding hope in California’s policy for inmates to receive sex reassignment surgery

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By Amaury A. Reyes-Torres

The LGBT movements in the U.S. and in Europe have taken significant steps towards legal equality and political change. However, much still remains to be done to ensure transgender rights. Many still face challenges related to their gender identity and its intersection with race, employment, equal access to accommodations and health. One such population is transgender inmates whose medical needs are often disregarded.

THE PROBLEM: MEDICAL TREATMENT FOR TRANSGENDER INMATES

Trans individuals are a vulnerable population in prisons. According to the National Center for Transgender Equality, almost one of every six trans individuals have been incarcerated at some point in their lives, and this ratio tends to increase dramatically when discussing trans black inmates. These inmates face a variety of challenges, including abuse from other prisoners and lack of adequate healthcare.

In particular, trans prisoners often lack the necessary facilities and healthcare options to make the transition to their chosen gender. Many trans people are not afforded hormone treatment or surgical procedures while incarcerated, consequently leading to or aggravating gender dysphoria, a serious medical condition often affecting trans individuals.

Gender dysphoria is “[t]he distress that may accompany the incongruence between one’s experienced or expressed gender and one’s assigned gender,” according to the American Psychiatric Association. It is “characterized by a persistent and intense distress about assigned sex, together with a desire to be, or insistence that one is, of the other sex,” according to the World Health Organization. Gender dysphoria severely affects individual well-being, and may lead to depression and even death. Appropriate treatment of this condition includes hormone treatment and sex reassignment surgery.

Many prison rules are not conducive to beginning or continuing medical treatment for gender dysphoria. Despite their medical needs, transgender inmates are often denied necessary medical services on a daily basis. Freeze frame rules, which many prisons across the country still adhere to, only allows prisoners to receive hormone therapy if they had been receiving treatment prior to incarceration. Since many trans individuals buy hormones on the black market, they are not allowed to continue their hormone therapy due to a lack of medical documentation. This leads to a physical reversal of previous therapy and exacerbation of gender dysphoria. Trans individuals are also often denied beginning hormone therapy or undergoing sex reassignment surgery while in prison.

TRANSGENDER RIGHTS AND ADEQUATE MEDICAL TREATMENT AS A RIGHT

Under international human rights law, the lack of proper medical treatment for inmates is deemed cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment. The European Court of Human Rights has held that prisoners must be detained in a condition compatible with his or her human dignity, meaning that prison conditions must ensure prisoners’ health and well-being. There must be, according to the court, compatibility between the standard of treatment and the illness faced by the prisoner. By the same token, the Inter-American Court of Human Right has held that the government is a guarantor of the health of the inmates, and must provide inmates with necessary and adequate medical treatment when it is required. According to the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners, medical services shall be provided for the sake of the physical and mental health of the inmate.

This practice clarifies the scope of article 7 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), which forbids cruel, inhuman or degrading treatments. The ICCPR Human Rights Committee has held that a state party has a positive duty to maintain adequate standard of health for the inmate. A state party violates article 7 of the ICCPR when it does not afford inmates appropriate medical treatment.

These human rights laws can be applied in the context of transgender inmates in the U.S. Although the U.S. is a party to the ICCPR and other relevant international documents that obligate it to protect human rights, the U.S. does not consider itself directly bound by human rights treaties, as they are not self-executing. Nonetheless, the proliferation of references to the importance of providing healthcare to prisoners in international standards as a factor in ensuring human dignity reflects a trend in the development of international law and underscores the respect for prisoner rights and transgender rights. Furthermore, both through its obligation as a state party to the ICCPR and through the eighth amendment of the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. must prohibit cruel and unusual punishment. Therefore, a denial of adequate healthcare to prisoners may violate both the ICCPR and the U.S. Constitution.

In fact, in April 2015, a federal U.S. court ordered the State of California to provide a sex surgery reassignment to Michelle-Lael B. Norsworthy, a trans female prisoner in California. Bringing a claim under Section 1983, a civil rights remedy for constitutional rights violations, Norsworthy argued that the continuous refusal of the state to provide her with appropriate healthcare, including sex reassignment surgery, violated the eighth amendment. The court agreed, and held that the state acted with deliberate indifference to the medical needs and concerns of Norsworthy as an inmate.

Not only have the courts upheld trans rights in prison, but the Department of Justice filed a statement of interest in a similar case arguing that “[f]ailure to provide individualized and appropriate medical care for inmates suffering from gender dysphoria violates the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition on cruel and unusual punishment.” The United States considers gender dysphoria to be “a serious medical need requiring appropriate treatment,” the statement said. Thus, failure to provide adequate medical services to trans prisoners, including hormone therapy and sex reassignment surgery, is a cruel and usual punishment under both the eight amendment and article 7 of the ICCPR.

TRANSGENDER RIGHTS: CALIFORNIA GUIDELINES FOR SEX REASSIGNMENT SURGERY

Despite all the barriers that trans prisoners face in attaining adequate healthcare, there has been significant progress and reason to hope for a better future. Recently, California settled a case in which the state agreed to pay for a trans inmate’s sex reassignment surgery. In the aftermath of this settlement, California Prison Officials announced guidelines under which inmates could opt for sex reassignment surgery. This is a significant breakthrough. California has become the first state to sponsor this kind of measures in favor of trans inmates. Moreover, California has one of the largest inmate populations in the United States, making this decision even more meaningful.

Under the guidelines, an inmate requesting these services will submit an application to a committee (the Headquarters Utilization Management Committee), which will then refer the inmate to a subcommittee (the Sex Reassignment Surgery Review Committee) for evaluations and findings. The subcommittee will decide whether or not there are any medical reasons that justifies withholding the surgery until they are resolved or mitigated. They will also consider whether the treatment that the inmate is currently receiving is effective. Lastly, it will decide whether or not the candidate should receive sex reassignment surgery.

This process is a significant victory for trans rights and human rights overall. Undoubtedly, there will be further questions that will need to be answered, and this system will require oversight to see if this new proceeding is effective and rights-respecting. But this practice could set an example for other U.S. states and other countries facing similar situations in which proper healthcare services are being denied to trans inmates. Most importantly, California has set an example of how it is possible to fulfill human rights obligations using domestic mechanisms.

Amaury A. Reyes-Torres is a Staff Writer for Rights Wire.

The views expressed in this post remain those of the individual author and are not reflective of the official position of the Leitner Center for International Law and Justice, Fordham Law School, Fordham University or any other organization.

Photo credit: Joseph Kranak/Creative Commons

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Author: leitnercenter

Rights Wire is the human rights blog of the Leitner Center for International Law and Justice at Fordham Law School.

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